Faking Japanese Red Lacquer (on to wood)

Discussion in 'General Modeling' started by ctrollen, Mar 23, 2015.

  1. ctrollen

    ctrollen New Member

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    Hi All,

    I'm new to RPF having joined only a couple of weeks ago, and I have some ideas for some builds that I would like to attempt.

    I have a couple of ideas in particular and the main material would be wood (nothing fancy and more likely to begin with a plywood or pine for when I screw it up!). I was wondering if anyone has any suggestions for faking Japanese red lacquer? possibly a (non-toxic) spray paint or something similar. I've searched for thing like gilders paste and waxes etc but would need the finish to be able to be safely handled without rubbing off.

    Maybe an initial color layer and then a clear sealing coat would be best, but I would love to hear any suggestions or ideas that would not occur to a novice!

    I'm looking for this kind of finish and colour. http://www.artglass.hu/pictures/full/japanese_red_lacquer_sake_bowl_diam_11cm._foto_2.jpg

    Many thanks!
     
  2. darth_myeek

    darth_myeek Sr Member

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    Just an idea to tuck away. If I needed to get a similar finish I'd use a nitrocellulose based lacquer. It was used on 1950's cars, and 1950's Fenders guitars, and I think vintage choppers etc.

    It's not good for your health (not inside your home, use a respirator, it's flammable, so no open flames, etc) There are tricks with it like shooting it at the right temperature, the right humidity, the right distance to prevent orange peel. While it dries in about 15-30 minutes, it's best after the final coat to let it cure for a month before buffing with rubbing compounds and polishing with auto wax, but it's so worth it. You can take the same paint from a satin finish to a high polish and then if you want to knock it back down to a satin finish you can with fine steel wool. Be super careful to watch your edges while sanding. It just takes a second to sand through edges and expose wood. Guitar replicas look amazing. Another cool thing is subsequent layers melt into previous layers, unlike other paints that sit in layers.

    Watch as many videos as you can on nitrocellulose lacquer application. Behlen's has good finishing videos.

    Here is a store that sells it by the can for guitar replicas. Take a look at fiesta red. Ask them if it's opaque and what primer should you use. Some of their semi transparent colors are color-balanced for direct application on wood. That means their white has a greenish cast which looks white over raw wood, but mint green over their white nitro primer.
    http://reranchstore.stores.yahoo.net/fencuscol.html

    Check out Behlen's wool lube. The name sounds kinda "wrong" on a certain level, but it allows you to wet sand and .0000 steel wool with minimal cure time. Then when you have the right coverage and basic even finish; let it cure for as long as you can stand it. Minimum two, but preferably four weeks and then rub & buff like a classic car. There is a nitro clear coat, which you may not need but it would add protection.


    -Mike
     
  3. ctrollen

    ctrollen New Member

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    Mike,

    Many thanks for the highly detailed answer - it's much appreciated. This sounds very interesting (and daunting) - I'll definitely look for some videos on the subject.

    Thanks again!

    Chris
     
  4. ataris121

    ataris121 Jr Member

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    enamel paint mixed to the right color and then a epoxy coat?
     
    madmikeee likes this.
  5. ctrollen

    ctrollen New Member

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    Thanks ataris!
     
  6. CSMacLaren

    CSMacLaren Sr Member

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  7. madmikeee

    madmikeee Sr Member

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    My thoughts exactly, there really are many solutions but just a good coat of enamel high gloss in the right color with a clear coat of some kind to protect it would be the way to go.
     
  8. ctrollen

    ctrollen New Member

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    Thanks to all - this is a great help!
     
  9. Axlotl

    Axlotl Master Member

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    I would seal the wood with something first (maybe a thinned wood glue or something, I dunno, I'd have to give it more thought) so it's not porous and the enamel can cure properly and give you a smooth glossy finish instead of soaking into the wood.
    But, I agree enamel will do what you want to do, and do it cheaply.
    Testors may have the color you want in a small spray can.

    *Edit: Here's a link:

    http://www.testors.com/product-catalog/testors-brands/model-master/auto-enamel-paint/sprays-eng-span

    Choose the "Expand All" option under the spray can pic for examples of all their colors.
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2015
  10. ctrollen

    ctrollen New Member

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  11. Axlotl

    Axlotl Master Member

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    I don't have a lot of experience painting on wood.
    I just remember the last time I did it just looked like painted wood.
    At the very least I would prime it first.
    That way you can see if there's any grain that might need filled to give you a good finish.
    Pre-prep will make or break your paint job.
     

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