Dyeing Polycarbonate

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.


red4

Sr Member
January 14, tried dyeing polycarbonate using Rit DyeMore Synthetic using instructions I found online. The results were very bad. I may need to revisit Rit later on.

January 15, I tested iDye Poly Green using the following instructions:
1. Fill stainless steel pot with 3 liters hot water. Water level should be half the height of the pot, or lower. This may be done with an 8 or 12 quart stock pot.
2. Add all contents of the iDye packet into the water, and mix until fully dissolved. This can be done before or after the water has started to boil.
3. Bring water to a boil. Do not exceed 212 degrees Fahrenheit.
4. Stir frequently throughout the entire process, as the dye will separate from the water.
5. Fully submerge the object that is to be dyed. It can be dangled from a nylon string, which is held up with a dowel that goes across the top of the pot. For the small Lego items I dyed, keep submerged for 1 whole minute, then remove and rinse in cool water to check the color. Resubmerge it in 30-second intervals, rinsing it with cool water each time you pull it out. Repeat until the desired color saturation is achieved.

These were my results. iDye Poly Green is too blue. I will test iDye Poly Kelly Green next time.
Zmzn5MM.jpg

7R3hqX0.jpg


The dark spots in the picture below may be due to not having washed the piece beforehand. I have not verified this though.
pfbBkRA.jpg


The light, crater-like spots in the picture below are due to bubbles sticking to the plastic. I believe keeping the piece submerged for longer than 1 minute will fix this issue, as the piece that was submerged for 3 minutes does not have any such bubble marks.
5rQkXGi.jpg
 
Last edited:

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

red4

Sr Member
I have now confirmed that Rit DyeMore Synthetic will not dye polycarbonate following the same directions I used for iDye Poly.
 

swgeek

Sr Member
IDye Poly is better than Rit for dying plastics. Also make sure you skim the surface before you put the part in the bath and right before you pull it out. It should help reduce weird marks on your piece.
 

red4

Sr Member
IDye Poly is better than Rit for dying plastics. Also make sure you skim the surface before you put the part in the bath and right before you pull it out. It should help reduce weird marks on your piece.

Would stirring instead of skimming help? The stuff on the surface should re-mix with the water.
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Jedi Dade

Master Member
To me it seems like it works pretty well but you may need to adjust your process to get rid of the inconsistencies...

Jedi Dade
 

red4

Sr Member
To me it seems like it works pretty well but you may need to adjust your process to get rid of the inconsistencies...

Jedi Dade
Agreed. I'm going to bring it to a boil first, mix the dye, then lower the temperature just enough to stop the boiling. Hopefully the temperature will still be high enough to dye the plastic.
 

Your message may be considered spam for the following reasons:

  1. Your new thread title is very short, and likely is unhelpful.
  2. Your reply is very short and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  3. Your reply is very long and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  4. It is very likely that it does not need any further discussion and thus bumping it serves no purpose.
  5. Your message is mostly quotes or spoilers.
  6. Your reply has occurred very quickly after a previous reply and likely does not add anything to the thread.
  7. This thread is locked.

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Top