Custom Werewolf

Discussion in 'Replica Costumes' started by Danny0425, Aug 17, 2015.

  1. Danny0425

    Danny0425 New Member

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    Hi, so i'm looking for a professional werewolf costume, something realistic and more on the beast side than the man. My ideas are something similar to the Lycan werewolf from the "Underworld" or the werewolf from the Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, mainly the Skyrim one. I've tried dozens of websites, however when i do find something that catches my eye, it is way overpriced. I have considered making my own, however i have no idea were to start or what to make it out of. I would want its mouth to move in conjunction with my mouth and a price of 1,000 dollars or less. If someone could help my find someone who could make this or point me in a direction to make it by myself, that would be really helpful.
     

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  2. gothic

    gothic Sr Member

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    for legs/feet try https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JeJ1LimPAk for the body your need a blank morph suit and cover it in latex. for hands and feet you can find half decent ones doing a google search. punching hairs in it is cool but time consuming there are a few youtube tutorials online your also find ones on building the head and ways of moving the mouth without electronics.
     
  3. Chaank

    Chaank Well-Known Member

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    What do you consider over priced? There is a lot of work in something like that.
     
  4. Danny0425

    Danny0425 New Member

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    I know they take a lot to make but I mean OVERpriced as in 6000+
     
  5. fallimar

    fallimar Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The ballpark for a good costume like that is usually in the $4-6000 range really. Price depends on quality of course, but you'll also probably be waiting a long time - I used to make suits like that. Good quality faux fur can range from $30-150 per yard/metre just by itself, so the materials cost is pretty massive by itself, not taking into account any of the other pile of materials you need or most importantly, time.

    Even a really basic full costume will probably set you back close to 2 grand.
     
  6. WilsonUndead

    WilsonUndead New Member

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    I built a full were wolf costume about two years ago, minus the head (I had a vision that didn't work out and due to time constraint couldn't do anything about it) but the body turned out great. The whole thing cost me (I think if I remember correctly) under $300?
    i have no pics (cuz I'm stupid lol) but if you want to know how I did it I could give you a description.
    i even managed to do the dog-leg thing (I know theres a name for it but at the moment idk).
    Anyways, my point is that for a movie quality suit, yeah I'm sure you're looking at around what other people have quoted but for a decent quality functional suit you could easily do it under $1000.
     
  7. fallimar

    fallimar Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Yep. Building it you can do - buying not so much! :)
     
  8. WilsonUndead

    WilsonUndead New Member

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    Oh sorry I thought we were talking about a build not a buy :S
     
  9. fallimar

    fallimar Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Looks like either way is ok according to the OP so all good :)

    Speaking of, @Danny0425 I can help out with links to a lot of cool places to get parts to make a werewolf and places that sell faux fur and stuff like that if you like - as for help building, I know a few techniques myself, I did build furry costumes and heaps of other stuff like that in the past so I can give tips if you need them.

    For most supplies, Dreamvision Creations has a huge range of cast resin and silicone parts to make all kinds of critter suits: https://www.etsy.com/shop/DreamVisionCreations
    I've used their stuff for a few costumes and it's good. Course you can always make your own parts, but something like one of their head blanks will give you a really nice solid base with the jaw action you're looking for.
    Fur is trickier depending on where you live, if you're in the US you'll have a much better range available than elsewhere generally.

    If you want to build everything from scratch, I can tell you how I do it or point you to tutorials and stuff. You can do a moving jaw with EVA and upholstery foam so long as you rig it properly.
     
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  10. Danny0425

    Danny0425 New Member

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    Yeah thanks, I could use all the help I need. I do plan to start learning but I really want this werewolf costume. Hopefully it'll teach my for further projects.
    However I mainly want advice of how to make the head of the first werewolf if you could help me on that.
     
  11. fallimar

    fallimar Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Sure, no worries.
    Well, if you look at the link I posted before you can get a head blank ready made, of course there are other people who make and sell them too - a search for "werewolf head blank" or "wolf head blank" should get you some results and you can check out the shapes you like. Even if you don't want to buy one, they'll give you a good reference point for making your own.

    As for the actual construction, it depends on whether or not you want to purchase a headframe. If you do, then it's just a matter of making an EVA foam or elastic backing so it sits comfortably on your head, then building on any extra details using upholstery foam (filling out the back of the head, making ear forms, adding snarl folds, that kind of thing), adding eyes and eye ports, adding fur and then detailing by shaving it down and drybrushing or airbrushing in detail.

    If you're not using a head blank, you need to build one. I do mine using foam as I said - basically the same method I used for my Space Pope (construction pics here) - an EVA foam "helmet" built to fit your head shape comfortably, an angled strap underneath your chin to support the jaw movement (for longer jaws you need to supplement this with elastic and a light, rigid support structure to get rigidity and full jaw closure) and then you carve foam features to build on it. IT takes a lot more playing around with the forms than starting on a premade base and a lot of design and referencing to make it look cool, but you do get a lot more flexibility in the design.

    Edit: Forgot a really important thing - make sure you figure out the overall shape and proportions -before- you start. Nothing worse than making your head to find out it's too huge and makes you look like a grapefruit on a toothpick! Best to start with photos of yourself and sketch over them to find a shape you're happy with, I just threw this one together in case you need an idea of what you can do.
    WerewolfProportions.jpg
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2015
  12. Danny0425

    Danny0425 New Member

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    Thanks again Fallimar. All that advice will help. But one last thing, would it be possible to look through the mouth and have it move. I know I won't get as much field of view but I think it might still make it cooler. I don't know for sure so recommend what you think.
     
  13. fallimar

    fallimar Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Hm. Possible, probably, but I wouldn't know how to help you with it unfortunately! I'd still recommend just using your own mouth movement and looking through the tear duct area, you can still build up your shoulders and neck area and look huge without needing to extend the head. Still entirely up to you of course though! :D
     

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