Custom Blade Runner Snub Nose

Collektor

Well-Known Member
Snub Kit.jpg
I recently purchased a 3D printer, and after running off the usual calibration prints, and small parts, I decided to take on a bigger print project. I've always wanted a snub nose variant of the Blade Runner pistol, so I set out to model it. After doing a fair amount of research on how Dave Goldberg did his, I decided to approach mine the same way and modeled it as individual components instead of a single solid model that would have to be split up later. This will also save time when it comes time to paint it.

Snub Right.JPG

Snub Left.JPG


Since I'm going the custom route, I changed and omitted some details and sort of put my own spin on this variant. It took about three to four days to model it as I'm not fully up to spec on Fusion 360, but I have worked with 3ds Max for a number of years so the transition wasn't too bad.

I wound up breaking up the model into 15 different parts and then printed off each one. After a few fails and revisions, I was able to get everything printed out and laid out. Then it was time for a quick dry fit of the parts before going into the sanding and painting.
Snub Kit Parts.jpg



Once I had everything laid out I realized that I'd made a crucial error, since I took the measurements for a lot of the parts off of a stunt cast of the original pistol, it turns out that this one is a but undersized. Not horribly small, but still smaller than it really should be. I'm still in the process of sanding the parts down, and smoothing out the grips. I'll update once I have it painted and fully assembled.

Thanks for looking.
 
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Collektor

Well-Known Member
Weird, they show up on my phone and pc, and they're linked from my album on here. will try to upload again later

Edit: Re uploaded the pics, can someone let me know if they're showing in the thread, since the image links were showing up when I made the original post.

Thanks
 
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Collektor

Well-Known Member
Update:

Finally got all the parts painted and assembled. After printing out the grips, I wound up giving them a coat of XTC-3D which actually worked really well to smooth them out to a near glassy shine. The grips are currently tacked on with double sided tape while I debate whether or not to mold them and cast a set in transparent resin. I'm still looking for a resin that will minimize air bubble entrapment as I lack a pressure chamber. Most likely I'll probably wind up revising the grips before its finally complete.
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Collektor

Well-Known Member
I agree, the more I look at them, the more I like that grey color. Kind of reminds me a bit of Luv's blaster. I might print up another set and give them a wash before adding the XTC, to see what they turn out like. One thing's for sure, I have to rework the area of the grips with the screws since the XTC pretty much ate the detail on the screw heads.
 

TK1961

Active Member
I don't want to be that guy but there are a lot of print lines. I would have spent more time sanding those out, other than that I like it.
 

Collektor

Well-Known Member
I agree it definitely needed more sanding and filling in some areas. Speaking of which, does anyone know if you can shoot filler primer through an airbrush is that going to cause a clog?
 
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funboy1013xx

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
it's just a "thicker" primer, you shouldn't need to decanter it into an airbrush. hold it alittle farther away and try it out on a part that has the least amount of "print" to be covered. nice even coat's, plenty of dry time and you probably wont even need to sand it. (y)
 

Helix6187

Active Member
A bit of tamyia putty could be simpler than to try to spray some filler primer with an airbrush.

And it's really easy to sand and polish with a 2000 grit.
 

Collektor

Well-Known Member
I did hit some of the parts with Bondo spot putty then sanded down. The side covers I filled with CA glue and then sanded down. Moral of the story is they aren't lying about how much of a pain sanding down PLA is.
 

funboy1013xx

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
sanding time is why I have always used bondo, quick cure, fast sanding and a nice tight bond. Ive been down that road with primer and man its good if you need a couple thin coats before painting but man, if its to thick and you havn't let it cure fully the outer layer is hard but the middle can still be soft, and that suck's when you think your almost ready to paint... and then your sand paper get's gummy... ARRGHHHH!! but I cant wait to see this beauty done! and your next grip paint job! (y)
 

McKeePhoto

New Member
Beautiful! What was the process to get the different shades of metal? Was it rub and buff or some other magic?
 

Collektor

Well-Known Member
Beautiful! What was the process to get the different shades of metal? Was it rub and buff or some other magic?
It was a mix of paint techniques, I used no rub and buff. They Steyr upper and the side covers were primed with Krylon gloss black that was decanted into my airbrush. The silver metal parts were airbrushed with Alclad Airframe Aluminum before being clear coated with Aqua Gloss. The black parts were likewise primed with Krylon gloss black, then I buffed in several coats of graphite powder before sealing those parts off with Testor's Metallizer Sealer.

Did a little color testing on a scrap grip while I was printing out my revised grips. Gave the grip several washes of brown and black acrylic then once that was dry I gave it a coat of XTC-3D to seal in the color. I'm pleased to see that the XTC didn't affect the paint when it was applied. Not a bad look, but the colors might be a bit too dark. I do like that the XTC finish is both super clear and smooth allowing you to see down into it to where the layer lines are. I'm still thinking of casting up a set in the traditional amber color before settling on the grips, though that grey color has kind of grown on me a bit.

grip.jpg
grip002.jpg
 
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