Christopher Nolan's OPPENHEIMER

Pepperbone

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I love Nolan's movies, and I love Cold War era projects. So for me, Oppenheimer is a great combo.

And Cillian Murphy looks (and is) perfect for the role.

Oppenheimer-Cilian-Murphy.jpg


 
Cillian Murphy is a bigger draw to me than Nolan at this point. I love Murphy in basically everything he’s in.

My opinion (probably a fringe idea) is that Nolan is too heady for his own good. He makes films that are so plot driven that even the characters are barely 2D images for the purpose of advancing the plot (they don’t even get names now, e.g. ‘The Protagonist’). I care less and less about the people in the movie with each release.

I think Nolan’s strongest film was The Prestige (My favorite of his films), and his characters have gotten worse and worse since then.

Hopefully because this story is centered around an actual person, Nolan can finally come back down to the ground and turn in a solid character-driven film.
 
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My opinion (probably a fringe idea) is that Nolan is too heady for his own good. He makes films that are so plot driven that even the characters are barely 2D images for the purpose of advancing the plot (they don’t even get names now, e.g. ‘The Protagonist’). I care less and less about the people in the movie with each release.

I think Nolan’s strongest film was The Prestige (My favorite of his films), and his characters have gotten worse and worse since then.

Hopefully because this story is centered around an actual person, Nolan can finally come back down to the ground and turn in a solid character-driven film.

I'm with you here. I'm glad that he's had the kind of success he has with the movies he makes (films as grounded and practical as much as possible), but I've never been a big fan of his mostly for his writing (and dialogue). I don't mind films where we don't know much about the characters, or if they're a bit thin--the act of doing becomes more important--what I don't like about his movies in particular is how heavy-handed, blunt, and jarringly dumb the dialogue feels in comparison to everything else. That's the problem with his and his collaborators' writing. He makes very slick and polished films but when it comes to writing what people say, it's always a heavy description of what we're seeing or about to see, or, worse, explicitly telling the audience who and what the characters are doing and how they feel. I think with Dunkirk, he's been trying to cover for that weakness by having people say less and just focusing on the construction of his plots, and the film around that.

Personally, I find Memento to be his best film, as that's where the bluntness of the writing works with the overall tone and construction of the film. The only downside of that is after having seen it and knowing what the big mystery is, it's hard to go back to as it's now lost the main draw.
 
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The trailer inspired me to search for Oppenheimer interviews.

For those interested, here's part of a 1955 interview with Edward R. Murrow about the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.

I particularly enjoy his choice of words when speaking.
It's a shame that few present-day high profile individuals don't have the capacity for refined language.
 
The trailer inspired me to search for Oppenheimer interviews.

For those interested, here's part of a 1955 interview with Edward R. Murrow about the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton.

I particularly enjoy his choice of words when speaking.
It's a shame that few present-day high profile individuals don't have the capacity for refined language.

I am having trouble understanding what Oppenheimer is saying in the video…

I recommend that he start every sentence with “Like”, blend-in the use of the word “totally” at various points, and make statements using modern “up-speak / up-talk” in which speakers make factual statements that sound as if they are posing a question.

 
I am having trouble understanding what Oppenheimer is saying in the video…

I recommend that he start every sentence with “Like”, blend-in the use of the word “totally” at various points, and make statements using modern “up-speak / up-talk” in which speakers make factual statements that sound as if they are posing a question.

Like, totally?
 
This might be common knowledge but Oppenheimer is being shown in 30 (mostly US) locations on 15perf/70mm Imax FILM. It’s advertised as limited engagements.

Seeing any new release on actual film is rare these days. I just booked opening weekend for the closest city offering the limited engagement on film.
 
I was really looking forward to seeing this in theaters but I think Im going to wait for it to stream as 3 hours with no break in a movie theater is not happening.
 
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About 2 more mins and this thing wouldn't have fit on the platter.
You would know way more than me on this but I am not even sure it’s all on one reel?

I was really looking forward rot seeing this in theaters but I think Im going to wait for it to stream as 3 hours with no break in a movie theater is not happening.

Sorry to ruin it - it’s a stretch for sure but I made it through The Batman last year so gonna try on this.
 
You would know way more than me on this but I am not even sure it’s all on one reel?
Most theaters now have digital. But, the Regal I worked at, still from video I filmed below, when LotR: Return of the King came out. It had a run time of 3 hours 20 mins, and it did fit on the whole platter....but just barely. Not sure if they had to cut all trailers, or only have a few.
So the pic above with Oppenheimeron it either is using a slight smaller platter, or because of all the added trailers and theater policy ads, is taking up the whole thing. Either way, it SHOULD be the whole movie one long reel.
Back then, reels came in metal boxes, like 3 smaller reels per box, which one movie was 3 or 4 metal boxes delivered by UPS or Fedex, and the projectionist had to build the movie, winding it up in the correct order on the one main reel.
There were a few times when a limited film was finished showing at our theater and was then going to play at another Regal about 25 mins away. So to save time, they had these clamps to hold the whole movie together and you could carefully pick it up. I got to drive a movie to the other theater in my own car on the clock....til I got lost because it was dark and I forgot which road to turn on.
Kinda fun to get paid to be lost with a 35mm film in your backseat....lol.

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Sorry to ruin it - it’s a stretch for sure but I made it through The Batman last year so gonna try on this.
I don't think you ruined it at all, I just get can't sit for more than two hours easily. Even when I'm on a plane I'm up every every hour walking around, annoying the hell out of everyone (sorry to be that guy). I might employ the old buy tickets for two shows and split it technique.
 
Heres a better picture. I forgot this was IMAX, although still runs at 24 fps, so length would be probably double actually now that I think about it. 70mm vs 35mm makes the whole thing a ton heavier. Just looked it up, says its 600 lbs. Thats pretty nuts. Not sure what the 35mm platters could hold, but I'm thinking NOT 600 lbs. I imagine it has to run a little faster to get the 24 frames to run per second, as an IMAX frame is quite larger than a 35mm one.
I wonder if they had to specially design this one. Not sure, but I'm pretty sure IMAX theaters aren't used to a full 3 hour feature film.
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