Can we talk clear coats? Matte/Semi-gloss/gloss

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ssdesigner

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I am looking at painting a number of prop guns in the coming months and was hoping to use an airbrush and Alclad metallic paints.

That said, I also really like the colors and quality of Tamiya model paints. My questions are:

1) how compatible are these two brands these days? Can one be applied over the other?
2) Are there clear coats that won't dull Alclad and at the same time won't attack Tamiya paints?

Or should I be sticking with all acrylic base or all lacquer base paints?
 

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JNordgren42

Active Member
I haven't had any issues with Mr. Color lacquer over Tamiya. That being said, I've only used that combo a couple of times, since I'm using Mr. Color pretty much exclusively at this point. Also, when I have done it, I've let the Tamiya cure very thoroughly before spraying the Mr. Color over it. I haven't used their clear coats over a metallic, so I can't comment on how it will look over Alclad, but they do offer quite a few different clears so I'd probably experiment.
 

ssdesigner

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

StevenBills

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Since the AquaGloss is water-based, it shouldn't attack the Tamiya acrylics in any way. I paint almost exclusively with Tamiya paints, and have never had an issue with it. Only when clear-coating them with a lacquer-based paint (Testor's Dullcote, RIP) have I had issues with crinkling, etc...

SB
 

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ssdesigner

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Since the AquaGloss is water-based, it shouldn't attack the Tamiya acrylics in any way. I paint almost exclusively with Tamiya paints, and have never had an issue with it. Only when clear-coating them with a lacquer-based paint (Testor's Dullcote, RIP) have I had issues with crinkling, etc...

SB

Fantastic, thanks!
 
Last edited:

starks

Active Member
Depending on what you expect you will always get some dulling of the alclad... its an effect and clear coating alters the effect. In saying that however a gloss clear and water based as the alclad one will have less of an effect. If you use a matt clear then the matting base sits on the surface and will distort the reflection.

As for painting between different paint types enamels, acrylics, lacquers, they are not really compatible as theyre different technologies.
I use acrylic clear over enamel base just fine but heres the trick... dont load your paint on. The wrinkling that takes place that StevenBills was referring to is caused by the loss of paint adhesion and tension.
Go paint a piece of cardboard and you will see it roll or curve up... this is the paint molecules puling together as they dry and expel solvent ( this is paint shrinkage). That process happens on everything you paint but on a rigid surface like plastic or metal the paint cannot bend it up like the cardboard but the point is that paints holding on under an incredible amount of tension and relies soley on its adhesion to not pull off the surface.

Now the crinkling is the loss of that adhesion.
2 products not designed to go together.
We have an enamel painted part, dried, now under surface tension.
We overcoat in acrylic.... those solvents soak through the enamel, wet underneath the enamel and release the adhesion of the paint from the surface. The crinking is now that un adhered film of paint pulling together in the same way it bent up the cardboard.

Overcoming the problem... light coats. Some products will just be far too solvent sensitive and wont take overcoating with anything else. Others you will get away with ok. Most model painting is light coats anyway but your looking to avoid putting on enough product in one application to avoid solvents soaking through and releasing that bond.

Cheers,
Josh
 

JediMichael

Master Member
I've only really used rattle cans with primer, paint, clear coat.
Trying to put a clear coat(gloss) over a chrome metallic paint to seal it lead to so many problems. Even using same brands, it bubbled up.
Best idea is always test it first before trying on the actual model.
 

ID10T

Well-Known Member
Slightly off topic, but perhaps relevant for the “sheen” aspect.

I needed to matte a watch dial. Most matte clears cloud the surface- basically a white cast is carried in the clear, which turns a black dial gray. So, it’s not truly “clear” but cloudy.

I tested a bunch of rattle cans on a #9 (I think) dark green welding glass. Doing this you could see as soon as it was dry, if it was “white” or clear.

I ended up with a Krylon product (it’s down on the watchmaking bench or I’d post a picture) that did matte the glossy black dial without “graying” it out. And it went on thin enough that the raised printing (pad printing) on the dial was still raised.

Now, will it react with another paint? You have to test. Ideally on the same substrate. Reason being: the paint may not appear to be attacked by the clear on one substrate; but on another it could delaminates the paint from the substrate.

in all cases be sure the paint is well cured before clear coating.
 

ID10T

Well-Known Member
Here’s the semi-gloss that’s not cloudy:

7340DEA6-1562-4868-852F-8A660A6646F7.jpeg
 

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ID10T

Well-Known Member
All I know is, when sprayed onto a welding shade glass, this remained the original green color, whereas the others I tested clouded the surface, like white powder on the green (Silica I presume).

So, to preserve the color, try this stuff.
 

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