Building a TMNT 2014 Suit Using Paper Mache?? Is it possible?

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The14thDr

Sr Member
So like the title would suggest, I'm looking for tips on making a TMNT muscle suit using just cardboard and paper mache. I've seen loads of builds on this site but I'm planning something much bigger, as illustrated by this terribly crude sketch I drew up on my phone.
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1423159714.662320.jpg
I want to make an ultra-bulky, super-powerful-looking turtle suit (think Leo and Raph-size). I'm only around 5'8 (give or take an inch) so my ideal size for the suit is about 6'. Is it possible? Or am I just completely mad? If not I may just build a shell, cut some bandanas and make myself some weapons.

------ The14thDr ------
 

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Egon Spengler

Master Member
I won't say it's impossible, but there are more flexible ways of doing it. One idea might be to make it from foam padding instead, but that could end up pretty warm.
 

sieghart937

New Member
i dont have a link for it right now but i remember seeing a guy doing venom and he made a giant suit out of foam to make it bulky and taller similar to what it seems you would want. try searching venom cosplay on google and you would probably find the build.
 

Sean Adams

New Member
personally for me paper mache is very much like resin work. its not as strong as resin (although it is pretty dam tough) but it gives little to no flexability at all. for the costume you're attempting its going to be a flexible suit surely, or am i misunderstanding :/

for the shell yeah i would say paper mache would do just fine, im a huge fan of paper mache for its versatility, its cheaper and more available than resin and fiber glass and with enough layers it can be just as strong

for the flexable arms and legs id say you want something a lot more flexible for sure like others have mentioned
 

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The14thDr

Sr Member
I won't say it's impossible, but there are more flexible ways of doing it. One idea might be to make it from foam padding instead, but that could end up pretty warm.
I was originally going to use foam but like you say, with all the padding on the muscles it's gonna get really warm really quickly. With luck on my side I'd probably only get about 2-3 hours in the suit before I'd have to get out for a cool-down.

i dont have a link for it right now but i remember seeing a guy doing venom and he made a giant suit out of foam to make it bulky and taller similar to what it seems you would want. try searching venom cosplay on google and you would probably find the build.
Thanks. I'll check that out and grab some ideas.

Posted this on another Turtle thread here but fits this one too:

Might want to contact this guy as he did an amazing Raphael costume from the new movie.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FmV97SEgcis

He also has a thread in the Technodrome forums (THE TMNT forum!) located here. :)
Thanks. I'll check that out tonight.

personally for me paper mache is very much like resin work. its not as strong as resin (although it is pretty dam tough) but it gives little to no flexability at all. for the costume you're attempting its going to be a flexible suit surely, or am i misunderstanding :/

for the shell yeah i would say paper mache would do just fine, im a huge fan of paper mache for its versatility, its cheaper and more available than resin and fiber glass and with enough layers it can be just as strong

for the flexable arms and legs id say you want something a lot more flexible for sure like others have mentioned
Thanks Sean. Foam would be an ideal candidate for the arms and legs but unfortunately it's going to get waay too hot over long periods of time. Also, I'm doing this on an absolute-zero budget so I only want to use materials that are readily available and free.

I think I can get around the flexibility issue by making the suit more action figure-like. I know that this will reduce the accuracy of the overall product, but I'm not too bothered by this as I think that hopefully people would be more interested by an awesome turtle suit than a few gaps, although I'm just being a tad optimistic here.
 

Sean Adams

New Member
like you im super budget conscious which is why i love paper mache so much. i use the flour and water method, £1 for a bag of flour and your good to go
i get all my card and newspaper free at work as i work in a warehouse environment.

just remember the skeletal part of the structure needs to be strong to give structure to the paper mache. i use corrugated cardboard double layered, but this does have its own problems when it comes to forming curves, but then what i build it does the job just fine

currently working on a proton pack myself and have used this exact method for doing so

sounds like you have a good idea good luck
 

The14thDr

Sr Member
like you im super budget conscious which is why i love paper mache so much. i use the flour and water method, £1 for a bag of flour and your good to go
i get all my card and newspaper free at work as i work in a warehouse environment.

just remember the skeletal part of the structure needs to be strong to give structure to the paper mache. i use corrugated cardboard double layered, but this does have its own problems when it comes to forming curves, but then what i build it does the job just fine

currently working on a proton pack myself and have used this exact method for doing so

sounds like you have a good idea good luck
Cheers Sean. When I paper mache I tend to use PVA glue and water, but I've never tried it with flour. Do you know which method is stronger?

For the construction method, I'm going with a corrugated cardboard undersuit for the main structure. Then I'll use balled-up sheets of newspaper to build the muscles before giving it two or three layers of paper mache to give me the 'skin'. To finish up I'll paint everything green. Problem solved. :)
 

Sean Adams

New Member
in all honesty each method has its plus and negatives. i only use flour and water because its cheap. i tend to mix it until its a slightly thick paste...its the flour that gives it the strgth rather than the water...same goes for the pva and water method. its not really the water that gives it the strength its the glue once the water has dried out/ evaporated

i would say pva and water is slightly stronger because the glue will harden a lot more than flour, but before pva flour and water was used as a very reliable glue. it sticks well and dries rock hard

on my proton pack ive used corrugated card with just a single layer of paper mache (flour and water mix) and its come out pretty solid, i might give it a second layer but it seems pretty strong as it is so ill most liekly end up leaving it

i just give it a light sand and its come out really smooth for painting too
 
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