Limited Run Blade Runner 2049 - K's blaster....in Metal

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brandomack

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
All of the components i handed off have come back prepped, and sprayed with etching primer. All of these will be fit to the action component once they have been assembled.
 

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Retroneon

Active Member
I've been following this thread from the beginning. But I can't pinpoint any one thing that has been giving you the most trouble. I think each new little issue compounded the previous ones.

You use traditional moldmaking techniques, which are great skills. Since you already decided to print the parts, wouldn't it have been more efficient to 3D print the entire positive mold? I saw someone else show this on the RPF, and it turned out great. Even the registration keys are printed. I wish I could find the post again, to show you.

Your 3D prints have been warping. And there's clay shoring against the prints in the positive mold. By having the parts already integral to the positive molds, the edges are prevented from warping. The gaps are more flush, and cause less flashing. And you can quickly add complex yet precise gates for pouring and venting.
 

brandomack

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I've been following this thread from the beginning. But I can't pinpoint any one thing that has been giving you the most trouble. I think each new little issue compounded the previous ones.

You use traditional moldmaking techniques, which are great skills. Since you already decided to print the parts, wouldn't it have been more efficient to 3D print the entire positive mold? I saw someone else show this on the RPF, and it turned out great. Even the registration keys are printed. I wish I could find the post again, to show you.

Your 3D prints have been warping. And there's clay shoring against the prints in the positive mold. By having the parts already integral to the positive molds, the edges are prevented from warping. The gaps are more flush, and cause less flashing. And you can quickly add complex yet precise gates for pouring and venting.
Don’t quite know what to say to that...Thanks?

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Retroneon

Active Member
Admittedly, my phrasing can be a bit clunky. I write a lot to clarify, but it can add confusion.

I start with praising a person's work. No matter how much trouble you might experience, I want you to know that it's good you even strive to make things at all. Then I offer advice, which I don't claim to be better than your current techniques. But if you use this advice, perhaps it might be useful.

My advice is to try printing a plastic positive mold. Use it to cast a silicone negative mold. Then pour molten metal into the silicone negative mold.
There's a video of that here:
 

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