Best way to make armour? (Stoormtrooper)

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Darth Storm

New Member
Hey guys,

So last night I was just thinking how cool it would be to have the full Stormtrooper armour. When I'm finished my bucket build I might make the full armour. I was thinking of using clay as it's obviously very sculptable (I may have just made that word up) and then when you fire it it's rock hard. Clay is also quite reasonably priced (I think).

Do you think this is the best way to go or are there better ways?

Is there any pointers or tips you have?

Any tutorials of similar builds?

Any thing would help me make my mind up.

I thought the best place to ask was here as everyone has so much knowledge that they share.

Cheers
DS
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

MrGzilla

Well-Known Member
i don't think fired clay would be a good idea.. it'd be so heave it'd be unwearable, and it would crack and break pretty easily. if you sculpted it and made a mold and cast it in resin that would work, but after supplies and time it would make more sense to buy a vaccuformed kit. there are some pretty reasonably priced armors out there. i got mine off ebay for just under $300 and you can get a less accurate fx armor for even cheaper than that.
thats just my thoughts on it, good luck
 

Theist17

Member
Seconded on the sculpt, cast, and pull. It's the best way if you're going to make your own and you're striving for accuracy.
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Darth Storm

New Member
What method do you guys reckon is better; clay molding or wood and bondo and stuff?

Anyone used both methods? Or is there a better simpler way?

Does anyone have a rough idea on how much this would all cost?

Cheers
 

avianoguitarist

Active Member
Vacuum forming doesn't capture intricate detail, so it doesn't matter if you use clay or wood--whatever is easiest for you to do.
Just building the apparatus will cost a few hundred. Then figure in the forming medium and supplies.
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Darth Storm

New Member
Vacuum forming doesn't capture intricate detail, so it doesn't matter if you use clay or wood--whatever is easiest for you to do.
Just building the apparatus will cost a few hundred. Then figure in the forming medium and supplies.
Alright cheers mate :)

I think I'll have to cross this bridge when my bucket is complete and see then if I want to continue.

Thanks
 

Fizbin

Well-Known Member
An easier (and much cheaper) way would be to just build and fibergalss the pepakura files that are floating around this very forum. ;)
 

Dirty

Member
An easier (and much cheaper) way would be to just build and fibergalss the pepakura files that are floating around this very forum. ;)
I AGREE :thumbsup but i ended up buying mine after the fact but was worth the quality and i had little time.
 

widescreen

Well-Known Member
The cheapest way is pepakura (as fixbin) suggested.

The easiest way is to buy a kit & adapt it to fit you. This is probably to most common way.

The problem with vaccuum forming is that you'll need to make some master moulds first.
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

oota goota

Well-Known Member
Nope! The form will collapse under pressure. You will need to either make the fibreglass really thick (lie 15 - 20 mm) or else back fill it with plaster. Hope this helps
 

Darth Storm

New Member
Nope! The form will collapse under pressure. You will need to either make the fibreglass really thick (lie 15 - 20 mm) or else back fill it with plaster. Hope this helps
Okay. At the time being its still ideas in my head but I'd love to have a full armor suit.
 

Psicorp7

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Boxing would help but it is better to fill it with a more solid material (like plaster) or just resin and figerglass the crap out of it to make it strong than to use foam. Foam, by its nature, is mostly air and will collapse in a vacuum.

I prefer the MDF and bondo method since the master bucks last quite a while and can be modified if you need to tweek a detail or two. If you do go that route it will not really save you any money over buying a pre-formed kit suit. The vacuum table (I made mine for about $100), the HIPS or ABS plastic, the bondo, the MDF and then the various little things (tools and such) quickly add up to what an OK kit would cost. Plus it would take you months longer to make.

The only real reason to vacuum form is to make multiple suits. If that is your goal, then rock on! If you just want one suit for yourself, I would buy a kit or do a resin/fiberglass/pep suit as a cheaper alternative.
 

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Don't want to see this ad? Sign up for anRPF Premium Membershiptoday. Support the community. Stop the ads.

Top