Bandai 1:72 Perfect Grade Millennium Falcon

Chrisisall

Sr Member
I have ACTUALLY decided that the dust particles do NOT bother me all that much, since the weathering will mostly hide it anyway. Attempting to correct the problem like Scudman mentioned sounds easier said than done, and would take a lot more work than I'm willing to put into it. So I decided to put the first round of weathering on the model. Not bad so far. Will do the underside next. Any thoughts on this decision? Should I still try to remove the dust? I'm not that bothered by it, to be honest, since it's not really that noticeable.

View attachment 1601749
If it doesn't bother you, then that's all that matters! Heck, it *may* even add a bit of texture that will end up looking good....
 

JV1138

New Member
If it doesn't bother you, then that's all that matters! Heck, it *may* even add a bit of texture that will end up looking good....
Yeah, ok. I kinda like the idea of the dust particles adding to the dirty and worn down look of the ship. The dust isn't noticeable from a good distance away anyway.
 

JV1138

New Member
Sounds good to me. The process I described is a lot of work, especially on a large model like the one you are working on.
Thanks for the suggestion though! I do not currently have the proper skill to carefully sand down any part of the model. I would feel too intimidated and might screw up in the process. Don't wanna do that! Besides, I think the dust particles add to the dirty overall look of the ship.
 

JV1138

New Member
Engine deck and ventral side wash just about complete. Not quite sure what to do next. Will likely tone down the wash in the panel lines and start the real weathering process.

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What's the next step I should take? Should I start painting the streaks and weathering, or should I put the tiny miscellaneous decals that are scattered all around the hull of the ship? Any advice is welcome. :)
 

JV1138

New Member
I just painted the edge of the engine plates, or whatever they're called, by the engines. I think they turned out well.

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Also, I'm not quite sure which direction I should go. Should I go ahead and start weathering the model and add the streaks, or should I add the tiny decals all around the model first, like in the bottom picture? Any advice?

PG Decals 1.jpg
 
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Analyzer

Master Member
Generally you want to do all your painting and decaling first before weathering

The reason is you want those to be a part of the weathering

For example, if you have a dirty grimy area, and a pristine clean decal is placed over it, the decal will look odd unless the intent was to show someone cleaned off the decal area. Maybe that is appropriate for something to see a registration number or something

likewise, a painted area should be done first unless you want that painted area to look like it got a fresh coat of paint

One thing to make sure with the decals is to gloss coat the area you are applying it to, then give then a day or two to dry fully, then seal the area again with some gloss coat to protect it from any weathering steps

An alternative I sometimes use when I am concerned the weathering process may damage the decais is to do all my really heavy oil weathering first, since that process can involve using turpentine washes and lots of rubbing with a towel/cloth, then when dry, seal it with gloss, apply decals, and then do a final light pass of weathering/mist coating
 

JV1138

New Member
Generally you want to do all your painting and decaling first before weathering

The reason is you want those to be a part of the weathering

For example, if you have a dirty grimy area, and a pristine clean decal is placed over it, the decal will look odd unless the intent was to show someone cleaned off the decal area. Maybe that is appropriate for something to see a registration number or something

likewise, a painted area should be done first unless you want that painted area to look like it got a fresh coat of paint

One thing to make sure with the decals is to gloss coat the area you are applying it to, then give then a day or two to dry fully, then seal the area again with some gloss coat to protect it from any weathering steps

An alternative I sometimes use when I am concerned the weathering process may damage the decais is to do all my really heavy oil weathering first, since that process can involve using turpentine washes and lots of rubbing with a towel/cloth, then when dry, seal it with gloss, apply decals, and then do a final light pass of weathering/mist coating
So should I add the decals first, then spray a gloss coat, then add the weathering? That much I think I understand. Should I also spray a dull coat afterwards? Maybe explain it a little more concisely, maybe? :)
 
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JV1138

New Member
Just completed the decals on the dorsal side of the ship. Next thing now is to spray a coat of gloss coat over the top side of the model. Next up, the ventral side.

20220812_211436.jpg


20220812_211458.jpg
 

JV1138

New Member
yes, gloss, decals, gloss, weathering, and then dull

You want a gloss under the decals to prevent "silvering"
The thing is, I already sprayed two coats of gloss coat over the panel decals. Then I added the small decal markings all over the model. I might spray another coat of gloss over that. But I think I should spray the dull coat afterwards because the shiny surface isn't really suitable for weathering properly. You get a nicer texture and weathering quality on top of the dull coat. What do you think? Weathering after dull coat?
 

Analyzer

Master Member
The thing is, I already sprayed two coats of gloss coat over the panel decals. Then I added the small decal markings all over the model. I might spray another coat of gloss over that. But I think I should spray the dull coat afterwards because the shiny surface isn't really suitable for weathering properly. You get a nicer texture and weathering quality on top of the dull coat. What do you think? Weathering after dull coat?
depends on what kind of weathering techniques

Things like panel line/pin washes work best over a gloss coat as they do not stain as much and forces the wash to settle into recesses easier while keeping the raised areas clean or at least easier to clean off.

In some cases though, for DOT filtering and streaking/ weathering with oil paints or dry brushing, a semi gloss or matte varnish is better

Things like pastels/powders would also adhere better to a matte varnish
 

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