AT-ST: Between two logs

Found some good behind the scenes photos.
I know mine won't be exactly the same, but more pics and always good to get it best you can.
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And one of the last frames before cutting the shot. I think the side walls bending in there at the impact point, and the the top and bottom bending outward still is good, as that is how I've got mind so far. I might try and bend the bottom part out even a little more to give it the smashed look without having to crunch in the middle point more. I think if I push that area too much, it will end up breaking apart instead of looking smashed. The super glue can only hold so much. Its quite tricky on how far you can take it before accidently over destroying it.
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The second log I remade. I'd say its still got a good day before its totally hard. So I'll can do a little more, but still need to wait before adding both logs to know how they will work fully.
 
I have seen scale model tank modelers use heavy aluminum foil in parts to represent crash/crush damage in parts/
You form it over the part to be replaced, then crush/tear/ding it up

Also, if it helps, in Sculpting a Galaxy, Lorne describes filming the head crush scene copied like this...

One crowd-pleaser was an AT-ST getting its head caved in by a suspended dual-log trap. This shot was achieved by using heavyweight "logs" -i.e., lead-filled miniatures six inches in diameter. The walker head couldn't be plastic, as it wouldn't crush in the right manner, so Paul created a styrene head and sent it to a company specializing in the nickel-plating technique used in motorcycle helmets. They coated the styrene head with a fine nickel skin that was 15/1000 of an inch thick (about the thickness of three sheets of typewriter paper). Then they melted the inner styrene core with acetone, leaving behind only the metal shell. Paul fit this hollowed head over an interior that included miniature renditions of the AT_ST crew. It crushed beautifully on screen. Except for that crew. Unfortunately we never get to see the doomed crew, even though the cabin had internal lights to illuminate them. They were actually weighted so they would flop correctly in their death throes.
 
Perhaps you could use some tubing or rolled up paper to form the clay around to keep the weight down?
Make sure you go back in and sand and scrape down the parts that have the black carbon on them. The raw carbon might not take primer well, and if it does, finish paint might peel off. I have had that happen before.
Can't wait to see more.
 
Perhaps you could use some tubing or rolled up paper to form the clay around to keep the weight down?
Make sure you go back in and sand and scrape down the parts that have the black carbon on them. The raw carbon might not take primer well, and if it does, finish paint might peel off. I have had that happen before.
Can't wait to see more.
I do like the burnt look, as its authentic, but I did think about it not reacting well with paint. I'll try some different tests of spare pieces. I wonder if you could add a clear coat on it like it is, and maybe paint on that. You would have to skip the primer part, but, if the clear coat can take paint ok, then add another flat clear coat over top that to protect it. But, I've never tried that before, so no idea if it would even work.
I love to experiment with stuff like that.
 
I see your point about the burned look. Apply a coat of primer, I suggest Tamiya brand, and see if it stays in place.
I have recently discovered that Tamiya primer is an excellent product and goes on thin without texturing. I have been using it exclusively for the past couple of years and I really like it.
Looking forward to more!
 
I've neve used Tamiya primer, but seeing how nice the paint is, I imagine the primer is top quality.
For a good flat clear coat, I have Mr. Super Clear flat.
Just went out and and burnt up some of the extra plastic parts. I'll wait like 10 or so mins and go hit it with the clear coat, and then go from there.

I did burn/melt a little more of the AT-ST head a little today. The top looks good, but from the melting, there is a gap on both sides....Sooooo, I think I'll try adding a little of the crunched aluminum foil in that area to see it it helps sell the metal idea. I'll get pics once I've tried it out.

I've been keeping busy. Still not feeling so good after being sick a week. This sore throat just wants to hang on.
On Sunday, saw that my church is having another Trunk or Treat again this year. I had already planned out a new idea. Decided after 2 years of Star Wars, I'd change it up and go with Ninja Turtles. I still need to see the new movie. So thats another project I'll be working on.\
I've also been working on a ton of video projects, and my drives are full of raw video. I really need to go through and get rid of whats not needed anymore.
And then what do I do, invite friends over for dinner this Friday night, as they are moving soon to Costa Rica. So now I have to also clean the house. Just hope I'm feeling better by Friday.
 
Heres what I tried. Burnt this whole area with the touch. Then, sprayed on the flat clear coat. Then, painted the left side gray. And finished it off with another clear coat.
Scratching at the burnt area after the clear coat didn't seem to affect it at all.
I think that will work out alright.

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I do like the burnt look, as its authentic, but I did think about it not reacting well with paint. I'll try some different tests of spare pieces. I wonder if you could add a clear coat on it like it is, and maybe paint on that. You would have to skip the primer part, but, if the clear coat can take paint ok, then add another flat clear coat over top that to protect it. But, I've never tried that before, so no idea if it would even work.
I love to experiment with stuff like that.
To make sure you don't have problems with the burn parts, you should soap them and dry them well before putting your primer.
 
Finally got a change to see both logs screwed in. They lean forward a tad to much, but from a straight on look like this, they look fine.
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Now to get them painted and do more to the main head.
But this sickness is dragging on and went into my chest.
Pretty sure its pneumonia.
My parents had some leftover amoxicillin, as they gave my Dad way too much a few months ago. So hopefully that will help.
Got so much to do.
 
That amoxicillin is really helping a whole lot. Getting the house cleaned up, mowed the yard, coughing up nasty junk. Yeah.
So for this project, got the logs primed last night and the first one painted with the first darker layer.
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Here without the flash. Being a log from the woods, it works out to have all the little random cracks and defects.
But, using the clay, if I have a project (with one in mind of course) where I'll need it to be super smooth. I suppose adding water can help, but maybe also a different kind of clay. Found this off Amazon and was pretty cheap. Haven't worked with clay since 9th grade. So around 27 years ago.
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I thought I'd touch both logs up before going to bed, and noticed they still had a slight shine. Looked at the fine print on the bottle....satin.
Totally didn't notice that. I've had that bottle for years.
Guess I'll have to go get some normal FLAT brown tomorrow, (later today) if I get the chance.
I think I better try and get some sleep. Big day with company by the evening.
 
Friends came over tonight. Hadn't seen them in awhile, and their family is getting ready to move to Costa Rica in less than 2 months, if everything works out.
So they had found this model at a garage sell thinking their kids might built it, but, never happened. Looks like someone in the past attempted to put some parts together, even painted one part.
I'm hoping all the pieces are here. I'll go through it and if it looks like it will work out, I'll make a post on that.
Paperword is dated, 1997.
Yay, more projects to distract me from other projects....lol.
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