Applying weathering over Model Master metalizers?

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Millenniumf

Well-Known Member
So I'm working on a set of engine parts and I've base-coated them with MM metalizer lacquers. I am working them into a really nice metallic sheen, over which I plan on putting on some weathering in the form of a grime pass using Tamiya acrylics and an oil scrub wash that's been thinned with odorless turpenoids. But mixing paint types can be tricky, plus metalizers are notoriously delicate, so I'm wondering if anyone has any tips for ensuring that my well-buffed surfaces don't get ruined in the weathering pass (y'know, other than the intentional bits).
 

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robn1

Master Member
Alclad clear is the only sealer that will work, anything else will dull the finish (and I'm not sure of Alclad's compatibility with Metalizer). In the future use something like AK Extreme Metal for a more durable metal finish.
 

retiredadguy

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I use them all the time. No matter what sealer, it WILL knock back the metal look by 10-15%. Stainless steal holds up the best. Titanium next. Graphite or Gun metal next, Burnished aluminum the least.

Use Tamiya weathering master pastels. (Or any other pastel) You can use water with some after you put them on (if your looking to simulate gooy oil leeks' of example). They will also diffuse more when you over coat them with gloss or dull coat. (which you need to do) They will look like you air brushed them. If you need it to be really shiny use Testers extreme gloss coat after your done. If you MUST use paint to weather ( acrylic or enamel) over coat your sealer with at least 4 to 5 coats. Also let your model cure for minimum 72 hours before you do any weathering.
A week is better if your not on a dead line.

If your NOT going to handle it at all ( going in a display case ) you can get away without using any sealer. But when you handle it, the Metalizer WILL come off on your fingers along with smudges or finger prints. (How would I know that?) sometimes you can polish them out, some time not.

Also I do not use the spung applicators that come with Tamiya weathering master. I use an old cut down skinny paint brush(s). Clip the ends so it is an 1/8 showing and grind it in to a paint palet to spread out the bristles as needed. That way you use the splayed out edge in crevasse etc. or use it to spread the pastels out.

Take an old model and test your technic first BEFORE you do any thing on the model your working on.. Sucks to have to go back and fix screw ups. (How would I know that?)

Hope this helps.
Best regards,
e
 

skahtul

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Awesome tips! I too have a model that is getting painted with the same brand metalizer.

What process are you using to get extra sheen out of them?

And yes, test! I just threw away a Moebis Pegasus because I used the wrong primer and the metalizer turned the finish to a paste.
 

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retiredadguy

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I generally use an old T-shirt. Watch out for little greblys sticking up. I use cotton swabs to reach small arias. The paint needs to be DRY before you polish. Waite a little longer than the direction state not to much though.

An FYI, I usually do NOT use a primer as metalizer doesn't react well with them. As you apparently found out. Test first. Depends on the primer. Stick with Tester primers for the best results as Tester makes them both and has done the tests on their own products. Some times you need to seal the primer BEFORE you use the metalizer.

Again TEST first.

Hope this helps.
Best regards,
e
 

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