ANOVOS picks up the high-end Star Wars Costuming License!

Timmythekid

Sr Member
Despite this person being banned, it is worth noting, this helmet was scanned from an original used on set. It was a hero piece and we got unprecedented access to it even down to the pantone chip color call outs. No clever wording here, just some hardcore, kick ass archiving from a great team.

Got a question for you about this. It puzzled me on the Propshop replicas as well, and I'm not sure if you guys are at liberty to say. With the advent of armor being CAD rather than sculpted in clay, with, I'm willing to guess, masters being produced on 3D printers, why is the common procedure still to create scan data from finished pieces, then have to spend time cleaning up that data into something useable? Wouldn't it be faster, easier, and more satisfying to the real hardcore rivet counters if LFL/Disney just emailed you guys the files to begin with? Just curious.
 

E Williams

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
It could be that many costume parts (not PropShop's hand props) used the digital sculpts as only a starting point, with traditional methods used to finish the construction and prep them for reproduction via molding. Those original part files wouldn't necessarily be identical to the shape and detail of reproduced and assembled items as seen on screen.
 

SithSim

Active Member


Received this a few days ago and I must say I'm totally happy with it. And a great job to everyone at Anovos!!!

Sent from my SM-G530T using Tapatalk
 

zeroskillz

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hey Got Maul, any chance I'll get the TK ensemble I ordered in May 2015 before the premiere of Rogue One?
 

Fener

Active Member
Got a question for you about this. It puzzled me on the Propshop replicas as well, and I'm not sure if you guys are at liberty to say. With the advent of armor being CAD rather than sculpted in clay, with, I'm willing to guess, masters being produced on 3D printers, why is the common procedure still to create scan data from finished pieces, then have to spend time cleaning up that data into something useable? Wouldn't it be faster, easier, and more satisfying to the real hardcore rivet counters if LFL/Disney just emailed you guys the files to begin with? Just curious.
Good point! :thumbsup
 

lmgill

Sr Member
Timmythekid,
Having worked with many 3d files for film props, the final product, is most often, not the "original file". Between; print clean up, post print added elements, modifications as a result of department head feedback, which are easier to add to the print with traditional methods, (Verses digital resculpt, then costly reprint) and on-set painting and aging, the final product can be very different fom the original digital file..
So a scan of the actual used costume or prop is better. But even then, there is a great deal of work after you have your scan. Virtual assembly, scaling correction, detail correction, mass production engineering, then printing the item and checking all your engineering and work against hundreds of photos of the original item.
So in the end, a master of a single helmet, ready to go to the company that's going to mass produce it, so they can set up their molds and tooling, can cost ten's of thousands of dollars!
 

Timmythekid

Sr Member
But even then, there is a great deal of work after you have your scan. Virtual assembly, scaling correction, detail correction, mass production engineering, then printing the item and checking all your engineering and work against hundreds of photos of the original item.!
See, that was my point - I'm pretty familiar with dealing with raw scan data and it seems like just a massive, unnecessary headache to data wrangle, not to mention risk potentially introducing unwanted clean-up and simplification of the geometry as the artist tries to boil the data down to relevant points, compared to just starting with the original file. Painting and aging wouldn't be an issue, as that's all going to happen after they produce the physical item anyways, but I suppose I can see how something complex might end up having the art department modify it further though. Cheers!
 

lmgill

Sr Member
See, that was my point - I'm pretty familiar with dealing with raw scan data and it seems like just a massive, unnecessary headache to data wrangle, not to mention risk potentially introducing unwanted clean-up and simplification of the geometry as the artist tries to boil the data down to relevant points, compared to just starting with the original file. Painting and aging wouldn't be an issue, as that's all going to happen after they produce the physical item anyways, but I suppose I can see how something complex might end up having the art department modify it further though. Cheers!
Perhaps I was not clear. Movie props and costumes, complex or not, are not "Draw it, Print it, Film it". Many (most I've work with) directors, designers, producers, cannot look at a drawing, not even a 3d one, and be sure they like what they see. So most props and costumes are sculpted or if they are printed, they go though many alterations and steps before the final product ends up on set. In fact one of the problems with 3d printing is you can now draw and print almost anything, and just because you can....is often the reason you shouldn't. There is much more to a film's total look, then the designers initial idea. Once on set, or in front of camera, often things don't look good or as you thought they would.
Take Vader's helmet as an example. The idea and very likely the original was painted all gloss black. But on camera, it does not read well, so you paint some areas dark gray, and to the camera and you the audience, it looks like an all shiny black helmet, when it is not.
On the film "Bram Stokers Dracula", we spent two days putting a two tone, air brushed lacquer paint job on Gary Oldman's armour. The designer, Eiko Ishioka, was very, very particular to the colors used. But, when it got to set, on direction from the art department head, the on set painter "aged" it with tempera paint mixed with floor wax and completely changed the look.
Just some examples of how fluid a film set can be.
 

craigjohn

Well-Known Member
But its not licensed and Original.Thats nice to have like the old MR and EFX props.Another thing is that its limited.
The Anovos helmets are nice...but without this things it has not the feeling like a real worthy replica.
Neither of my TM Vader helmets, nor my GH ROTJ helmet will have a silly little plaque/stand. I doubt anyone would ever say "they don't feel like a worthy replica". In fact, all three helmets are propped up on a $9 USD clear acrylic paper towel roll holder. ;)
 

Kroenen77

Sr Member
Neither of my TM Vader helmets, nor my GH ROTJ helmet will have a silly little plaque/stand. I doubt anyone would ever say "they don't feel like a worthy replica". In fact, all three helmets are propped up on a $9 USD clear acrylic paper towel roll holder. ;)
You really wanna compare a TM Vaderhelmet with a Anovos One???:lol

There are Props who needs the paper and plaquestuff in my eyes...but a TM is not one of them!
 

craigjohn

Well-Known Member
Anything above the Rubies Deluxe doesn't really need a plaque for validation - the build quality speaks for itself. Including the Anovos.

Lichtbringer, I doubt I could either. But yes, the only reason to have a plaque (really) would for that reason alone. Especially if your collection looked like JKNO's. :)
 

Mara Jade's Father

Master Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Anything above the Rubies Deluxe doesn't really need a plaque for validation - the build quality speaks for itself. Including the Anovos.
Agreed. The first offerings from MR had the cases and plaque stands optional. You could save on buying the prop replica without it. After the first few offering they made it standard. I am not a big fan of prop cases because they tend to take up too much space if you have a lot of items in your collection. I would rather go with space saving alternatives. The problem is that when they become standard, you feel obligated to use the stands because you paid for them. i know some sell them off but i never know what replicas i may choose to sell in the future and i know they are more valuable with the stands.


I feel that the focus should be on the helmets and not the stand or plaques. Which is why my helmets are all on a $6 IKEA Hemma table lamp stand with the wire removed.
Agreed and great idea,
 
Top