ANH DL-44 in Canada?

kenobibale

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hey everyone. Was wondering where the best place or best way to get a decent ANH DL-44 in Canada? Pretty strict laws regarding firearms and replicas. Has anyone had success getting a doopy doos DL-44 shipped over here?
 

Win7ermute

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Hey everyone. Was wondering where the best place or best way to get a decent ANH DL-44 in Canada? Pretty strict laws regarding firearms and replicas. Has anyone had success getting a doopy doos DL-44 shipped over here?
I think the closest you are going to get is the evike AW DL-44. Depends on how accurate you want to get and what you are willing to do to get there I guess.

edit: I just looked that up, it's a resin piece ? You will have zero issues at customs with that. It's just real metal replicas that they might seize. Anything that is resin and doesn't look like a real firearm is no problem. I've imported several PKD blasters (including all metal), and lots of resin/composite blasters (ST, 5th element, new TR, etc) with no issues.
 
Last edited:

kenobibale

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I had looked into the AW DL-44 but i was worried because it was airsoft. Plus it probably wouldn't be suitable for cons or anything in public due to it being a "functioning" piece. That's why I was looking at resin. So you think I would have no issues having a resin piece shipped even if it resembles a real firearm? would it need to be in pieces or could i get a fully built kit shipped?
 

Win7ermute

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I had looked into the AW DL-44 but i was worried because it was airsoft. Plus it probably wouldn't be suitable for cons or anything in public due to it being a "functioning" piece. That's why I was looking at resin. So you think I would have no issues having a resin piece shipped even if it resembles a real firearm? would it need to be in pieces or could i get a fully built kit shipped?
If you get an unpainted resin kit they won't even look at it. If it's fully built and painted it just can't be recognizable as a real firearm, and the DL-44 looks nothing like a real firearm. I can't speak to cons, I don't do that stuff but really once the evike is weathered it doesn't look any different than a quality replica (other than obviously being metal). Plus you can buy them at airsoft places in Canada so no issues with customs.

Now if you tried to ship a metal mauser replica (or even a painted resin one) you would be taking your chances.
 

kenobibale

Active Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
If you get an unpainted resin kit they won't even look at it. If it's fully built and painted it just can't be recognizable as a real firearm, and the DL-44 looks nothing like a real firearm. I can't speak to cons, I don't do that stuff but really once the evike is weathered it doesn't look any different than a quality replica (other than obviously being metal). Plus you can buy them at airsoft places in Canada so no issues with customs.

Now if you tried to ship a metal mauser replica (or even a painted resin one) you would be taking your chances.
Thanks for the replies. I will look into the Evike one as an option. At least I know resin shouldn't be an issue.
 

Win7ermute

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Thanks for the replies. I will look into the Evike one as an option. At least I know resin shouldn't be an issue.
One more thing: Who ever ships it to you, make sure they put "science fiction prop" or something like that on it.
 

TazMan2000

Sr Member
I've got three DoopyDoos kits into Canada several years ago. Generally, you probably won't have a problem, however, it all depends on the custom agent in Canada. If they open it up, and they can identify replica pieces of a banned weapon, even if they are resin, they can legally seize it.

TazMan2000
 

Win7ermute

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
Sure, there is always a bit of a gamble involved, and you should always be prepared to eat the cost of something you import.

I'm just saying that the chance has to be really small, given the extensive list of resin and metal blasters hanging on my wall, and nothing ever having been confiscated.
 

Timmythekid

Sr Member
I tried to go the Evike route with their E11. Velocity put the kibosh on that - not that it shot above the legal limit for airsoft in Canada, but that it shot BELOW the permitted range. Figure THAT one out.
 

Win7ermute

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I tried to go the Evike route with their E11. Velocity put the kibosh on that - not that it shot above the legal limit for airsoft in Canada, but that it shot BELOW the permitted range. Figure THAT one out.
No kidding, the lower limit makes zero sense. I've picked up the DL-44 and pulse rifle as airsofts, really great solid platforms. The E11, there is a Canadian guy on etsy making a terrific partial metal unit.
 

TazMan2000

Sr Member
I really don't understand the rules on why they could seize a resin pistol, where the mostly it could be converted to firing is rubber bands (not likely), but allow some airsoft machine guns, assault rifle and pistols that almost identically match their real world counterparts that actually fire projectiles.

TazMan2000
 

Halliwax

Legendary Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
All these packages X-ray scanned? Like at the airport? Or just randomly opened?

If it’s randomly opened I’d build a box with a fake floor in it. Remove the fake floor and hide the replica
 

TazMan2000

Sr Member
As far as I know, every package that goes through Canadian customs gets X-rayed. If you build a false compartment and they find out about it, there could be federal charges. After that every package you ever send and receive will probably be scrutinized. In any case, DoopyDoos will never do that. They will mark the customs declaration with the contents, like "resin model kit". To an X-Ray the kit parts may not be totally recognizable all jumbled together, and since there is little, to no metal in the kit, (there may be some metal screws or maybe uniting posts) it won't trigger extra suspicion. I have heard, (don't take this as gospel) that resin kits of weapons will have no trouble getting through, but anything assembled, most likely will.

TazMan2000
 

Win7ermute

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
As far as I know, every package that goes through Canadian customs gets X-rayed. If you build a false compartment and they find out about it, there could be federal charges. After that every package you ever send and receive will probably be scrutinized. In any case, DoopyDoos will never do that. They will mark the customs declaration with the contents, like "resin model kit". To an X-Ray the kit parts may not be totally recognizable all jumbled together, and since there is little, to no metal in the kit, (there may be some metal screws or maybe uniting posts) it won't trigger extra suspicion. I have heard, (don't take this as gospel) that resin kits of weapons will have no trouble getting through, but anything assembled, most likely will.

TazMan2000
Well, like I said, my experience says different. I honestly don't think they care about anything that is a sci fi prop and has enough differences from a real firearm that anyone who knows wouldn't mistake it for one, be it metal or resin. I've shipped a full tomen and a kit tomen, no problem. They only thing they did was ding me with brokerage charges.

As for airsoft and how realistic they are but somehow the muzzle velocity parameter makes it okay, that's beyond me. There's one in Calgary here and I cannot believe the stuff they have hanging on the walls. I've seen cops go in there just to look.
 

chubsANDdoggers

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
I shipped this from the US to Canada without issue. Just included a letter indicating that is was 100% a sci-fi prop intended for display purposes only. Explaining what film it was from and it’s importance in the cinematic universe. Not sure how important any of that is but figured it couldn’t hurt. It’s pretty much all steal parts as well and there was no delay in shipping..
D78FB44E-F1E8-4895-A9D5-6AB1ED8DADD0.jpeg
2FDFCB25-5929-4524-A053-B89843523D0B.jpeg
 

Win7ermute

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
For reference I just had a fully built Boba Debt Hoth DL-44 shipped to me, again no issues other than a little customs levy.
1037117
 
Last edited:

dr_slurpee

Sr Member
RPF PREMIUM MEMBER
The muzzle velocity for airsoft matters because that is the range where they have determined it could cause injury but not death. Anything bellow is a replica firearm which is prohibited/illegal no matter the material it’s made from or colour (some exceptions if the receiver or magazine is clear or brightly coloured and or identifiably over or under sized as with many toys). Within the range is still considered a firearm but it is a classified as an "uncontrolled firearm" which are exempt from licencing and some of the storage rules, and only have the stipulation of being over 18 to own. Anything above the range is classified as an actual firearm.

So it gets pretty muddy, especially with the laws as seen by Canada Customs vs RCMP. RCMP go by if it’s a accurate replica of a current model (anything that uses a cartridge) firearm. Customs is sort of the same but they can deny entry of an item even if it’s not quite an accurate replica. This could be appealed and it’s not first tier agents that make the decision about it, they flag it then it would move on to an agent that actually knows about firearms, especially in the event the ruling was appealed. This is all info I got from not the chief firearms officer of Ontario and the agent (at the time) that makes the final rulings for my port of entry.

I of course am not giving any legal advise but you should look into the process and laws yourself before you potentially waste money. There are things you can do to smooth out the process, trying to mislead, hide or lie about the contents of a package, as has been mentioned, can be taken as an admission that you or the shipper are knowingly trying to break laws which of course would be bad. Accurate declaration is key, but you can try to avoid some red flag stuff like “gun” without being deceptive.

A DL44 all assembled should be pretty safe because it no longer is a realistic depiction of a current model firearm. Again though better to do the legwork than to follow other’s advise. ;)
 

TazMan2000

Sr Member
I read over the import laws. To me they seem pretty clear and somewhat harsh. However, as with anything, interpretation is the problem. In my experience, I've never had anything get confiscated by customs, but I've read several posts from members who have, and it was pretty much the same prop. A resin kit of and E-11 will make it through, but I've heard that a built one of the exact same kit, get confiscated. If you take a built E-11 and rip off the scope, and other greeblies, you now have and illegal weapon replica. I guess police don't want this to get into the wrong hands and used in a bank robbery or something. But the "criminals" could just go down to the BB gun store and pick up a entirely realistic looking M-134 minigun off the shelf, or a MG-34. It must be OK to rob a bank as long as you buy your replica weapons locally to support the Canadian economy.

I've tried to order a Pulse Rifle direct from Evike, and Evike cancelled the order and refunded my money citing that they won't ship that into Canada because of the laws. Months later, I bought one off the shelf in a local store. So an importer can legally bring these in and mark up the price +100 bucks, but I can't order the exact same thing and get it shipped in. Strange.

TazMan2000
 
Top