99% Iso alcohol vs. 100% acetone

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by drakeprimeone, Feb 29, 2012.

  1. drakeprimeone

    drakeprimeone Well-Known Member

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    I have read suggestions for both of these methods to remove grease / finger prints off of aluminum (shield blanks). Can someone school me on the difference between the two if there is any? Is one better than the other? Are they meant for different things / surfaces? Thanks guys
     
  2. DrewSmith007

    DrewSmith007 Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I use 90% isopropyl alcohol on the dexter knives to remove prints. Acetone is quite a bit more hazardous, I personally wouldn't use it for that. But, I don't paint over my aluminum so the acetone may do a better job in that regard.
     
  3. cayman shen

    cayman shen Master Member

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    Acetone is quite a bit more aggressive, isn't it? But also worse for your health I'd imagine :lol
     
  4. YenChih Lin

    YenChih Lin Sr Member

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    Isopropanol is an secondary alcohol, acetone is a ketone, structually slightly different, flammability different. Aceton can dry out the skin with temporary white blemishes.

    Isopropanol
    [​IMG]

    Aceton
    [​IMG]
     
  5. drakeprimeone

    drakeprimeone Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys, other than health concerns with using, is one more effective than the other?
     
  6. Shylaah

    Shylaah Sr Member

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    Well, they are both solvents but as others have said, acetone is much harsher.

    While the 99% iso alcohol is safe and effective to use to clean stuff like printer heads, battery contacts, little electronic components that become "gruby". Also used to mix with, apply and remove theatrical make-up and to disinfect the skin prior to getting a tattoo. I don't think you'd want to use acetone for any of these!!

    You use acetone when you want to strip off all the oils and dirt and gunk before painting or priming or more cleaning, mostly on metals. Since it is a plastic solvent, you'd not want to use it to clean plastic. I don't think you'd ever want to use it on a finished surface of any kind, but it can be used to clean and de-gloss if you're going to paint.

    For what you're asking about using it on, "to remove grease / finger prints off of aluminum (shield blanks)", if it's just some mild machining oils and finger prints, the alcohol should work fine. If it needs heavy degreasing, then you might need to step up to the acetone.

    I always like to go with the more environmentally friendly option first anyway..........

    Shylaah
     
  7. Alan Castillo

    Alan Castillo Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    While it is repeating what all have said, acetone is much harsher. Alcohol is definitely the way to go between the two :thumbsup. Don't risk ruining your object.

    Do what Drew said, use 90% isopropyl alcohol with a soft cloth. It's the safest way to go. I use it to clean lenses, so it's very gentle and does the job perfectly on delicate glass with no risk of scratching, effecting the coatings etc. Aluminium is very sensitive to scratches.
     
  8. Alan Castillo

    Alan Castillo Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Oh, I must add, if you want no risk whatsoever, use a product like Windex diluted at 50%. It works wonders on fingerprints, grease etc.

    And again, a soft cloth, or even better, cotton wool.
     
  9. drakeprimeone

    drakeprimeone Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the input guys. Well after trying everything the alcohol seemed to work well on fresh prints / painters tape residue. However nothing worked on the prints that were there from what I believe were there before it was shipped to me. IDK... is it possible it happened while it was created and they were baked in? Here is a pic of the inside of the shield you can see it along the top and the right.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. Alan Castillo

    Alan Castillo Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    That's almost a whole hand print !

    If a protective layer was put onto the metal and handled before it dried completely, there's no way you're going to get that off without removing the whole layer and redoing it I'm afraid :(

    You'd have to use a soft buffer and then re-apply.
     
  11. drakeprimeone

    drakeprimeone Well-Known Member

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    Yup, thats what I was afraid of. Unfortunately I don't have the skill to do that safely/cleanly. :( The front of the shield is pretty clean so there is that. Maybe I can arrange something with the fabricator.
     
  12. Alan Castillo

    Alan Castillo Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    .... a replacement would be in order :thumbsup
     
  13. drakeprimeone

    drakeprimeone Well-Known Member

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    Thanks again, here is hoping...
     
  14. DrewSmith007

    DrewSmith007 Well-Known Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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