3D Printing armour and props?

Discussion in 'Replica Props' started by Aiden26, Apr 9, 2015.

  1. Aiden26

    Aiden26 Member

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    Hey guys, so in this post I would like to ask some question about 3D printing armour, Props, and the printers themselves. So first off,

    Is there a way to scale models before printing them like in the pepakura software?

    I noticed people that print helmets need to modify them so they can take it on and off. Is there a way that I can just slip the helmet on? Or is it based on the design?

    I see there's multiple materials to print with. Which one is best for props and armour?

    Is it possible to turn Pepakura files into 3D printable files?

    Which 3D printers have a large platform? I understand it will cost more but I don't want a ton of parts to glue together.

    I'm looking for Halo reach Helmet files along with Marine and ODST? The only helmet I can find is Master Chiefs Halo 4 Helmet.
     
  2. RogueTrooper

    RogueTrooper Well-Known Member

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    You question should be....."how long is a piece of string?"

    You have too many questions and you're being lazy.

    Try Google.....try the RPF search engine.

    The RPF is not Costco.....

    Think about what you really want to know...try Google for 12 hours and the come back and ask a FOCUSED question.

    Rinse and Repeat;)
     
    Sean likes this.
  3. Aiden26

    Aiden26 Member

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    Of course I tried searching already.

    I can't find any files
    The videos I found about turning pep models into print barely explain anything at all.
    All the printers I find have around the same platform
    And I can't find much about Printed Helmets.
     
  4. RogueTrooper

    RogueTrooper Well-Known Member

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    I just typed your search words into google and found a wealth of information and youtube videos...seriously...spend a day digging the net and then come back and ask a very FOCUSED question.

    Seriously..it's not magic;)

    - - - Updated - - -
     
  5. cavx

    cavx Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    @Aiden26 You should search X-Robots videos on YouTube. He prints all sorts of things and has to break his larger parts into smaller parts for printing. He then has to join them back together. Because he prints mostly in ABS, he can use acetone to join them.

    He designs most if not all of his projects so can break them down. I am not sure how you would go breaking a Pep down.

    So unless you have a really large printer, the answer is probably going to be a no.
     
  6. Exterminator

    Exterminator Active Member

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    Well, if gluing a few parts together is a bit of a strain, you could get a ZCorp ProJet 860Pro printer with a build volume size of 20 x 15 x 9 inches, but it will cost you over $121,000 ... never mind, think how much you'd save on glue. Hmmm. :unsure You would STILL end up gluing things together, even at that size, so no glue savings there, then ... or you could just pay someone to make them for you, no need to tire yourself out lifting that heavy tube of glue. :facepalm
     
  7. Gordon Gekko

    Gordon Gekko Sr Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    No, you haven't. This isn't some arcane subject that no one knows anything about. It's the tech of the moment and there are tons of resources on the RPF and the internet at large.

    You really googled "3d printing helmets" and couldn't find any info????
     
  8. TimSnowman

    TimSnowman Member

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    I would also advise against printing helmets/armor, unless you plan on sanding/finishing them for molding. A 3d printed helmet/armor set would be ungodly heavy. ABS plastic is pretty dense.
     
  9. docx

    docx New Member

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    It depends on your infill settings, but you get into a "weight vs resiliency" analysis there. Using 3-D printers for making initial masters seems to be a better idea for larger objects, I agree. Time to print large objects is quite high, especially if the object is larger than your print bed can accommodate. The downside is, for someone who doesn't have casting knowledge (or a workspace to do it in), the idea of simply 3-D printing a prop is very appealing. Sadly, much like the X-Ray glasses that used to be advertised in the back of comic books, the reality is more complicated.
     
  10. TimSnowman

    TimSnowman Member

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    Agreed. But even low-density/sparse infilled prints get to be pretty heavy at that scale. I dunno, with any budget 3D Printer, the amount of finishing you have to do is comparable to just scratch building the piece. But you're totally right, not having the knowledge or resources to do that makes 3d printers that much more attractive.
     
  11. Fatesalign

    Fatesalign Member

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    1. This one question is easily looked up, but to answer it, yes. You can either use CAD software or whatever you plan on slicing with.

    2. It purely depends on the helmet. For example, the ironman helmet requires it unless you make it way too big.

    3. It's really up to you. ABS is more flexible so less prone to breakage, but it can shrink. PLA is rigid and can break pretty easily but prints well and doesn't have the same odor. I would personally suggest using the prints as a mold for resin.

    4. Only if you can convert them to .STL

    5. Do some research on this. There are too many to list. Do you want pre built or like a rep rap diy? The i3 and the robo 3d are pretty good. Solidoodle as well.

    6. All I can think is to look in thingiverse.com.
     
    Last edited: Apr 9, 2015
  12. zanderwitaz

    zanderwitaz Well-Known Member

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    If you're new to all of this and just want halo stuff, get some resin kits. I won't get into a debate here but if you're using someone else's file and printing them out (especially using some one else's printer as a service) then you're not really making it anyways. You'd spend most of your time doing finish work that could be spent on a far superior material (resin vs PLA most of the time).

    I can point you in the right direction for nearly any halo bucket, and probably some armor sets too.
     
  13. JOATRASH FX

    JOATRASH FX Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    A good brand of PLA does have flex and is a lot less brittle than most resins. It's also a lot easier to glue if you use acrylic cement, which will bond it just like model glue and styrene. An 0.8mm shell with 15-20% infill would be OK for just about any prop or armor piece unless you are going to subject it to heavy pounding. (Obviously you have to model joints and connection points for proper strength.)
     
  14. Fatesalign

    Fatesalign Member

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    There are some decent PLA like Colorfabbs, but I would argue it would be too heavy and definitely not as strong as a mold. You can use plastics instead of resin, but don't get me wrong. It can be done and there are some good PLA options, but they arent as good as ABS.
     
  15. TazMan2000

    TazMan2000 Sr Member

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    PLA by design, is supposed to be biodegradable. I guess it depends on how much exposure it gets to the elements, but I would assume that a wearable suit of armor may actually get more exposed than a model in a showcase. I'm sure painting will help seal the model, but is this prolonging the inevitable? I have a few samples from shows that I have attended and they seem still pretty solid, but I do live in a drier area. Has anybody had any problems such as this with PLA?

    TazMan2000
     
  16. Aiden26

    Aiden26 Member

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    I guess I didn't mention it but I'm not wearing the armour right off the bat. I'm molding it and casting it in poly foam.
     
  17. Fatesalign

    Fatesalign Member

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    That would be best. Good luck.
     
  18. MEOWorksCreative

    MEOWorksCreative Active Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Even though PLA is biodegradable, no one really knows for sure how long it takes haha. I think you'll be fine wearing PLA stuff outdoors for years without any degradation. PLA is, however, sensitive to heat and can flex and bend if left in hot sun. This literally takes like heat stroke sun though!
     
  19. JOATRASH FX

    JOATRASH FX Master Member RPF PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I don't have any experience with printing ABS so I'll have to defer to you there (and but vacuforming it sure), a lot stronger than PLA. But a resin piece of the same thickness as a PLA print would be a lot heavier and MUCH more brittle (unless we're talking about rubber-mixed urethane of course). I printed a helmet faceplate a couple weeks ago, maybe 3-5mm thick overall at varying points and it weighs almost nothing compared to what it would if cast, and I doubt that I could snap it in two, which I could definitely do with resin. I've also printed a Colonial Marines armor knee cap test, with 0.8mm walls and NO infill (i.e. hollow space between the walls) and it is strong enough that I would troop in it. (Weak spots would however be strap connections.) From everything I've read about printed ABS, there's nothing to convince me that it would be better than PLA unless you wanted extreme durability. But to each his own of course.

    I think this is one of those things that gets a bit mythical after a while. It may be biodegradable on paper and if you subject it to the elements for a few years it may show some wear (and I suppose direct sunlight may kill it after a whilelike it does many materials, including resin), but I have seen no evidence at all that it's in any way more unstable than other materials for making props, with or without paint. (I've subjected PLA to a whole host of stuff and beyond partially dissolving in acetone it's pretty resilient.)

    ***edit***
    What is wrong with the RPF this week? Every post I make, on whatever computer, gets posted twice!
     
  20. Fatesalign

    Fatesalign Member

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    I shouldn't have used the word resin. A foam is really what I meant when it comes to armor. As far as PA vs ABS, it is a massive difference. The PLA by colorfabb is closer though.
     
  21. Moxxus385

    Moxxus385 New Member

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  22. shadowstar123

    shadowstar123 New Member

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    Hie guys im just saying
    yess u can 3d print props 11005725_10153039549789303_312622518_n.jpg
     
  23. clarence

    clarence Well-Known Member

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    I have two printers a Robo 200x200x200mm build size and a TMTCTW Jupiter 2 300mmx200mmx360mm build size of course You can print props but to do a wearable helmet if your printer could print it in one go You would probably grow a beard quicker!! all of the items in the pic were 3d printed apart from the lawgiver and the HIC DSC00417.JPG Star trek badges noisy cricket wolverine claws to name but a few. Big prints take alooongg time and that is when it completes some get to 90% then stop.Go and look on thingiverse then buy your printer. good luck
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2015

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