3D effects

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Shoop

New Member
First time prop maker...

Had a prop made by a buddy, it is a model of Thorn from Destiny.

I see countless standard paint finishes of black and green and I want to go on a different route ...

I want to replicate the acid rose ornament, however, it requires a bunch of tiny scoring and marking along the barrel that will require various painting methods... I'm not too concerned with the painting so much as adding the effects of the scoring and such.

I have epoxy putty, but I'm having a heck of a time both getting the right shapes and getting them to stick to the prop without falling off.

Should I be looking into using a soldering iron and going for a more "dramatic" effect? Or are there other recommended tips and tricks?

I'll try to attach reference pics.

Any tips would be greatly appreciated!!
 

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Riceball

Master Member
For the effects you're looking at achieving, a soldering iron would probably be your best bet, you'll just need to be careful to not poke too deep.
 

Darth Lars

Master Member
For the pock-marks, I would mark them carefully and make them with a small cylindrical router bit on a Dremel.
I would wear a dust-mask, but I would not need to worry about fumes.

I have epoxy putty, but I'm having a heck of a time both getting the right shapes and getting them to stick to the prop without falling off.
Am I correct in assuming that it is a resin cast in full scale? Resin casts should be washed with dish soap and water to get rid of any mould-release from the casting process, or things will not stick well to the surface.

Water is often used to smoothen epoxy putty but if you have got water on the surface it will not stick as easily.

In tricky spots where I want to apply epoxy putty, I first drill a small hole or dimple with a Dremel to give the putty more leverage.
Sometimes, I even drop superglue into that hole and sprinkle baking soda: superglue+baking soda puffs up to a hard crystal. When that has dried (which goes quickly) and you have brushed away the excess soda, you could get an anchor to apply putty onto.
 

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