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  1. Tommyfilth's Avatar
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    Jul 8, 2010, 2:07 PM - Sculpty baking (the right way) #1

    Actually there is no right way, but I have seen a number of articles on baking Polymer Clay and thought this information could be useful to some of us here.
    I would suggest buying a dedicated toaster oven. Go to the local resale you might have some luck, scrape the crumb tray off or even throw it away, or go buy a new one for your kitchen and take the old one to the workroom.
    I'm putting the Manufacturer specifications at the end because we already know that information even thought it might not be the best way.

    Safety First
    Regardless of what method you use practice proper safety precautions. Never use tools or dishes for food after using them for polymer clay and be careful handling hot items.

    Clean your oven thoroughly after baking polymer clay if it dedicated to polymer clay use or if clay wasn't baked in a sealed container like a roasting bag.

    Ramp Baking

    Ramp baking is a technique for gradually baking polymer clay to achieve a hard but minimally darkened result.

    Starting at a low temperature of around 175-200 F bake for 30 minutes, increase the temperature by 15-30 and bake for 20 minutes, continue increasing the temperature by 15-30 and baking for 20 minutes after each increase until the temperature reaches the manufacturer recommended temperature. Bake at the recommended temperature for 30 minutes. Allow the piece to cool completely in the oven before moving.

    This method requires careful monitoring to make sure the piece doesn't start darkening excessively. Some oven temperatures can spike significantly, always use a separate oven thermometer to monitor temperature.


    Under Baking

    Under baking is a technique used to try and prevent the darkening that some clays experience. It involves baking under the recommended temperature, usually at around 200 F, for an extended period of time often 1-3 hours depending on the thickness of the clay.

    The main risk of under baking is a polymer clay piece which is weak or degrades over time due to the clay not being fully cured.


    Over Baking

    Over baking is a form of ramp baking used by some sculptors like Casey Love usually with super sculpey to get a very hard result with no cracks. Because the technique causes significant darkening of the clay it's used for sculptures that are to be molded for casting or painted.

    Start at 225 and leave the sculpt for an hour, raise the temp to 250 for another hour, raise the temp again to 275 for 2- 3 hours or until the Super Sculpey has turned a dark caramel or even as dark as a reddish brown brick color. Shut off the oven and leave the sculpt to completely cool down before removing the sculpture. If you are baking a rather thick sculpture use the same method above but raise the temperature slower and in smaller increments.

    Manufacturer's Specifications

    What the makers of polymer clay brands recommend.

    Super Sculpey

    • Super Sculpey should be cured in a preheated 275 F (130 C) oven for 15 minutes per quarter inch of thickness. DO NOT MICROWAVE. For example, a piece of " thickness would be cured for 30 minutes. The layering method is recommended for lager pieces of construction.


    Premo

    • Premo! Sculpey should be cured at 275 F (130 C) in a preheated oven for 30 minutes per quarter inch of thickness. DO NOT MICROWAVE. Once cured, the colors intensify and deepen.


    Sculpey III

    • Sculpey III should be cured in a preheated 275 F (130 C) oven for 15 minutes per quarter inch of thickness. DO NOT MICROWAVE. If you're unsure whether your piece is adequately cured, try pressing the tip of a fingernail into the bottom of your piece after it has cooled; it will leave a mark but will not actually enter the clay.


    Fimo

    • Any home oven is suitable for hardening FIMO. Preheat the oven at 110C/230F. Place the FIMO model on an aluminum sheet, and plate or glass sheet and put it in the oven. Depending on the size of the model and the thickness of the walls, the hardening process takes approx. 20-30 minutes. FIMO reaches maximum hardness when completely cool.


    Prosculpt

    • Cured at 275 F (130 C), this clay can be used in a household oven. For every 1/4 inch of thickness, it should be cured for 10 minutes.


    Kato Clay

    • Kato Polyclay, oven hardening polymer clay, bakes at 300 F (150 C). However, it can also be cured at 275 F (135 C) with good results and has been approved to cure at 350 F by our toxicologist, however caution should be taken when curing at that temperature, time should be limited to 10 minutes as you will run the risk of discoloration. You should never exceed 365 F. In prior laboratory testing, it has been determined that tensile strength increases

    hopefully this can help some of us out in the curing process, here is a link to the original article, I have re-posted excerpts of, with all the glorious ads
    Techniques for Curing Polymer Clay

    *added july 12th by Franz Bolo*
    Originally Posted by Pzak
    I bake at 220 F. First, you need to make sure the oven is at temperature before you put the piece in. Most ovens ramp up fast, and unless it is a convection oven you will burn thin pieces.

    Make sure your armature is solid and can hold the sculpt without flexing. When polymer clays bake, they become quite rubbery and will crumble easily. Also, parts that have been cooked with become rubbery as well so don't count on them to support your piece.

    And if you have used CA glue, it can soften at this temperature and loose its adhesive properties. I have had the thin CA glue actually go back into solution and glued my fingers together when I wiped away what I thought was water on the piece.

    If you have very small parts like horns or fingers, you can also cover them with foil to reduce burning them.

    Don't get too stressed about discoloration. I accidentally left a piece in the oven over night. It turned black but after priming, you couldn't tell there was a problem. Actually, when you are complete with the piece, I would recommend cooking it for a long time until it turns almost caramel color (regular SS, not the sculptors gray). It will be very hard and durable. Cooking to short can make the piece crumbly, but easier to sand, so keep that in mind.

    Lastly, I would suggest you turn the oven off and let it cool before trying to move it. That's when most breakage occurs.

    But if you want to part the piece out, you can make perfect cuts when it is hot with an exacto blade an it is like cutting silicone. This works great if you have already cut the armature an you are on the final bake.

    BTW, I usually bake my piece many times before they are complete.

    I forgot to add, be careful using a heat gun. If you get it too hot too fast you will cause it to blister and you will have to dig them out and fill it back in to fix it. Sanding won't fix the problem because it they will resurface if you bake it again. I wave my heat gun back and forth while heating to avoid over heating the surface.
    Last edited by Tommyfilth; Jul 12, 2010 at 1:47 PM.
  2. Capn_Jack_Savvy's Avatar
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    Jul 8, 2010, 2:33 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #2

    I have also read from various Sculpey jewelry making websites that after baking put your item into cool water immediately. That increases the hardening strength of the item. I believe this may only be for Sculpey III and FIMO.
  3. Member Since
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    Jul 8, 2010, 2:39 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #3

    A friend of mine has always had great success with boiling
    his sculptures. Tells me its the best way to avoid burning your work.
  4. Member Since
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    Jul 8, 2010, 3:53 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #4

    Hm. never thought about using a toaters oven. Ive always just used my regular oven. Put my sculpey piece on a towel covered tray for the required time, depending on the thickness of the piece, and viola.
  5. foxbatkllr's Avatar
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    Jul 8, 2010, 4:00 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #5

    I've been able to bake super sculpey with a heat gun. I have used this method when the sculpey is to be incorporated into a piece that can't be put in the oven or the piece itself is too fragile to move without distorting the sculpture.
  6. Tommyfilth's Avatar
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    Jul 8, 2010, 4:46 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #6

    TK648 said: View Post
    A friend of mine has always had great success with boiling
    his sculptures. Tells me its the best way to avoid burning your work.
    I like the boiling idea, I would think you should bake it first to at least a plastic state so that fragile pieces would not break.

    Tommy
  7. Ramiel's Avatar
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    Jul 8, 2010, 6:32 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #7

    Actually, with the right technique you CAN bake super sculpey and fimo in the microwave, just fill a microwave container with water, put your sculpts in it and microwave it at 500 or 650mw for about 5 minutes, it works.
    Just use a container (tupperware or other) designed for cooking in the microwave and the water should be above your sculpts, you can also re-bake them, just don't use said container for cooking food afterwards

    P.S.
    Great list of techniques!
  8. Member Since
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    Jul 10, 2010, 1:01 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #8

    as a newbie i made a really big mistake..i read this thread and put it in the oven at 275 degrees but it was 275 degrees centigrade (365 farenheit)!!! DOH! the whole thing burnt badly

    serves me right i should read the thread properly :P
  9. Contec's Avatar
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    Jul 10, 2010, 1:28 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #9

    manueld12 said: View Post
    as a newbie i made a really big mistake..i read this thread and put it in the oven at 275 degrees but it was 275 degrees centigrade (365 farenheit)!!! DOH! the whole thing burnt badly

    serves me right i should read the thread properly :P
    You REALLY need to clean that oven out. Burnt sculpey is toxic.


    I use a ovenbag to put my sculpey pieces into.
  10. Member Since
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    Jul 10, 2010, 1:43 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #10

    contec said: View Post
    You REALLY need to clean that oven out. Burnt sculpey is toxic.


    I use a ovenbag to put my sculpey pieces into.

    thanks for the tip about oven bags..im gonna get some
  11. Tommyfilth's Avatar
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    Jul 10, 2010, 3:18 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #11

    manueld12 said: View Post
    as a newbie i made a really big mistake..i read this thread and put it in the oven at 275 degrees but it was 275 degrees centigrade (365 farenheit)!!! DOH! the whole thing burnt badly

    serves me right i should read the thread properly :P
    did it blister or crack?

    Tommy
  12. Member Since
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    Jul 10, 2010, 5:35 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #12

    Tommyfilth said: View Post
    did it blister or crack?

    Tommy

    heres what happened..visually :P

    BEFORE




    AFTER




    Base got warped and it got all burnt everywhere else...after priming it with a grey primer its not so bad..except for the base
  13. Tommyfilth's Avatar
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    Jul 10, 2010, 6:47 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #13

    Yeah, it's not too bad, I would say you could saw off the base and make a new one bake it separately and glue it together. did it firm up in the lighter colored areas?

    Tommy
  14. franz bolo's Avatar
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    Jul 10, 2010, 7:23 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #14

    PZAK does great work and posted this a while back:

    Pzak said: View Post
    I bake at 220 F. First, you need to make sure the oven is at temperature before you put the piece in. Most ovens ramp up fast, and unless it is a convection oven you will burn thin pieces.

    Make sure your armature is solid and can hold the sculpt without flexing. When polymer clays bake, they become quite rubbery and will crumble easily. Also, parts that have been cooked with become rubbery as well so don't count on them to support your piece.

    And if you have used CA glue, it can soften at this temperature and loose its adhesive properties. I have had the thin CA glue actually go back into solution and glued my fingers together when I wiped away what I thought was water on the piece.

    If you have very small parts like horns or fingers, you can also cover them with foil to reduce burning them.

    Don't get too stressed about discoloration. I accidentally left a piece in the oven over night. It turned black but after priming, you couldn't tell there was a problem. Actually, when you are complete with the piece, I would recommend cooking it for a long time until it turns almost caramel color (regular SS, not the sculptors gray). It will be very hard and durable. Cooking to short can make the piece crumbly, but easier to sand, so keep that in mind.

    Lastly, I would suggest you turn the oven off and let it cool before trying to move it. That's when most breakage occurs.

    But if you want to part the piece out, you can make perfect cuts when it is hot with an exacto blade an it is like cutting silicone. This works great if you have already cut the armature an you are on the final bake.

    BTW, I usually bake my piece many times before they are complete.

    I forgot to add, be careful using a heat gun. If you get it too hot too fast you will cause it to blister and you will have to dig them out and fill it back in to fix it. Sanding won't fix the problem because it they will resurface if you bake it again. I wave my heat gun back and forth while heating to avoid over heating the surface.
    FB
  15. Member Since
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    Jul 11, 2010, 3:12 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #15

    Tommyfilth said: View Post
    Yeah, it's not too bad, I would say you could saw off the base and make a new one bake it separately and glue it together. did it firm up in the lighter colored areas?

    Tommy

    yea it firmed up properly
  16. shadowman's Avatar
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    Jul 12, 2010, 8:54 AM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #16

    has anybody used and baked sculpty on top of pepa/resin? Does it work?
  17. Member Since
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    Jul 13, 2010, 11:53 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #17

    shadowman said: View Post
    has anybody used and baked sculpty on top of pepa/resin? Does it work?
    I've baked ss/s3 blends over resin cast parts before if that's what you mean...
    At official temp the resin will typically swell, crack or chemically separate (any trapped air will obviously expand as well, so unless it was cast under pressure/vacuum conditions you'll have bubbly - sometimes partial liquification as well, I.E. material sweating out of the resin). You can undercook or boil and get where you need to go, but the resin and the clay will expand/contract at different rates, so you have to be careful when heating additive sculpting or the mod and original parts won't match up.

    I'd also only suggest this if you're working something to remold, but then there are probably better methods (wax, epoxy, bondo, etc)

    Straight S3 (purple) multi-baked over resin casting (red) as a base tech:
    Last edited by Tothiro; Jul 14, 2010 at 12:01 AM.
  18. Formerly cobalt crimson Wes R's Avatar
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    Jul 14, 2010, 12:09 AM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #18

    I use boiling on my action figures, you have to leave it in a little more as it takes a bit longer it seems to me. I know for my figures i have to take them out and let them cool slightly then put them back in that way the plastic doesn't melt or warp.
  19. crystalbaud's Avatar
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    Orlando, FL
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    Jul 22, 2010, 1:28 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #19

    I too have been using the boiling method for my last 2 projects. Have had good results with it so far.
  20. Tommyfilth's Avatar
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    Jul 22, 2010, 1:53 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #20

    "Hey Boilers" post your procedure for boiling so I can add it to the Unapproved Methods in the first post.

    TL
  21. Member Since
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    South Florida
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    Jul 23, 2010, 3:47 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #21

    Very informative thread. Thanks for starting this one! Reading all of these this and tricks is making me want to break out my box o' Sculpey this weekend.
  22. zorg's Avatar
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    Jul 24, 2010, 9:24 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #22

    manueld12 said: View Post
    heres what happened..visually :P

    BEFORE




    AFTER




    Base got warped and it got all burnt everywhere else...after priming it with a grey primer its not so bad..except for the base
    turn him into a scarecrow from wizard of oz
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	25-07-2010 02-22-29.jpg 
Views:	52 
Size:	61.6 KB 
ID:	30164  
  23. Robert412's Avatar
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    Louisiana
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    Jan 22, 2011, 10:50 PM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #23

    Another boiling question...

    I used a hockey mask as my armature, does anyone know if I can boil my mask? Or will it warp or melt.
  24. reddawg's Avatar
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    Sep 22, 2011, 7:01 AM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #24

    im intrigued about the boiling method , i use prosculpt anybody know if it will harden when boiled like sculpy , im a beginner at this so tips would be appreciated , this thread has been very helpfull
  25. Ray22 is offline Ray22
    Sep 22, 2011, 8:27 AM - Re: Sculpty baking (the right way) #25

    When I started using Sculpey I thought will it cure if I put the piece in a pot of boiling water? so I made a test piece and threw it in for about 10 minutes drained the water and WA-LA! it worked. Many times I put a piece n the oven set the wrong temp or just plain forgot it was in the oven and WA-LA a well done burnt bubbly piece Lol, but the boiling trick does work.

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